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What Humans Are Really Doing To Our Planet

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8 replies to this topic

#1
VolterWight

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http://mic.com/artic...?mbid=social_fb

 

 

ZjczNWQ1NGNlZCMvRjV6WVNGc1ZsbTh6ZXVvT2NP

Source: Pablo Lopez Luz/Foundation for Deep Ecology

Mexico City, Mexico, one of the most populous cities in the Western Hemisphere.

 
MDUxM2RhNWNlNyMvbUtqS0dMNXF1REdpV3FLbWtv

Source: Digital Globe/Foundation for Deep Ecology

 

 

Los Angeles, California, which is famous for sometimes having more cars than people.

 
 
OWVjZmRlNzVkMiMveHNVeDU1SU9WX3V0ZmJqNlM2

 

 

 

ZjVlOGU2NDNjMCMvSFpkS1liYnZaOGM3a3V2aFFv

 

Former old-growth forest leveled for reservoir development, Willamette National Forest,

 

ZjZkYjVjMDNjNyMvMUN1emZ2RlFQR1VOZGZleDdQ

Source: Cotton Coulson/Keenpress/Foundation for Deep Ecology

North East Land, Svalbard, Norway, where rising global temperatures are fundamentally changing the ecology.

 
MTYyMDIwZDFjYSMvczE2UTB1aWE0bmcxWDBTRFM4

 

Source: Digital Globe/Foundation for Deep Ecology

The world's largest diamond mine, Russia.

 

OGQ0ZWMzMWMwZSMvN1puWllqR0tWZ1FQTEttbDRR

 

Amazon jungle burns to make room for grazing cattle, Brazil

 

YzI3NTZkNTU3NSMvYXByWUJydTh4VnRvSXJBdjFK

 

Source: Garth Lentz/Foundation for Deep Ecology

Tar sands and open pit mining in an area so vast, it can be seen from space. Alberta, Canada.

 

MWU5OWRjMzA4ZCMvNW9NYTFTb1IwQk0tMnVvVHNJ



#2
Samir

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Next generation ki problem hai yaar... Lol

*** Majestic! A hunter is a hunter even in a dream!***


#3
VolterWight

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Next generation ki problem hai yaar... Lol

 

how old are you? If you're within the age group of 0-30, trust me, this OUR problem! Entire island nations will be lost to rising waters within our lifetime. There will be wars over freshwater resources in this century like there were for oil in the previous century. We are undergoing a sixth period of mass extinction in our recorded history. We've virtually depleted all of the world's fisheries. C02 and Methane levels are at an all time high in our atmosphere. The Chinese literally don't have clean air to breathe in their cities. You say this is a problem for future generations? Thats ignorant to say the least

 

You're ok with kicking the can down the road? 



#4
VolterWight

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Next generation ki problem hai yaar... Lol

 

Case in point, watch the video 

 

http://www.theatlant...utm_source=SFFB

 

Feeding Nunavut: What Happens When a Hunter-Gatherer Society Runs Out of Food? Jun 25, 2015 |

 

Video by Mark Andrew Boyer

 

Nunavut, Canada's largest and northernmost territory, is grappling with widespread food insecurity in the age of climate change. Inuit who live in the north traditionally depended on subsistence hunting of caribou, seal, fish, and other wild game—which are now being replaced with a wide variety of foods that are imported from the south. These goods are hugely expensive because of the labor and cost involved in shipping to Arctic regions. "People are hungry," says Nunavut resident Leesee Papatsie in this documentary by the filmmaker Mark Andrew Boyer. "We want the people of Nunavut to stand up, to say something, [and] for the Inuit to be more self-reliant."



#5
LongLusciousLegs

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Jesus how does one even breath in Mexico? no Oxygen in that place


Edited by LongLusciousLegs, 28 June 2015 - 11:26 PM.

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#6
LongLusciousLegs

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how old are you? If you're within the age group of 0-30, trust me, this OUR problem! Entire island nations will be lost to rising waters within our lifetime. There will be wars over freshwater resources in this century like there were for oil in the previous century. We are undergoing a sixth period of mass extinction in our recorded history. We've virtually depleted all of the world's fisheries. C02 and Methane levels are at an all time high in our atmosphere. The Chinese literally don't have clean air to breathe in their cities. You say this is a problem for future generations? Thats ignorant to say the least

 

You're ok with kicking the can down the road? 

 

Unfortunately people are not aware of these facts and the ones who are informed couldn't care less. The biggest culprits are governors and people in positions of authority however we can make a difference on a small scale, recycling, riding a bicycle, transport instead of using your car etc


Edited by LongLusciousLegs, 28 June 2015 - 11:25 PM.

tumblr_lrjxgcV7OE1qfzhnw.gif


#7
VolterWight

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The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here: The worst predicted impacts of climate change are starting to happen — and much faster than climate scientists expected
 
BY ERIC HOLTHAUS  August 5, 2015

 

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Walruses, like these in Alaska, are being forced ashore in record numbers. Corey Accardo/NOAA/AP

 

 

Historians may look to 2015 as the year when shit really started hitting the fan. Some snapshots: In just the past few months, record-setting heat waves in Pakistan and India each killed more than 1,000 people. In Washington state's Olympic National Park, the rainforest caught fire for the first time in living memory. London reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest July day ever recorded in the U.K.; The Guardian briefly had to pause its live blog of the heat wave because its computer servers overheated. In California, suffering from its worst drought in a millennium, a 50-acre brush fire swelled seventyfold in a matter of hours, jumping across the I-15 freeway during rush-hour traffic. Then, a few days later, the region was pounded by intense, virtually unheard-of summer rains. Puerto Rico is under its strictest water rationing in history as a monster El Niño forms in the tropical Pacific Ocean, shifting weather patterns worldwide.

 

On July 20th, James Hansen, the former NASA climatologist who brought climate change to the public's attention in the summer of 1988, issued a bombshell: He and a team of climate scientists had identified a newly important feedback mechanism off the coast of Antarctica that suggests mean sea levels could rise 10 times faster than previously predicted: 10 feet by 2065. The authors included this chilling warning: If emissions aren't cut, "We conclude that multi-meter sea-level rise would become practically unavoidable. Social disruption and economic consequences of such large sea-level rise could be devastating. It is not difficult to imagine that conflicts arising from forced migrations and economic collapse might make the planet ungovernable, threatening the fabric of civilization."

 

Attendant with this weird wildlife behavior is a stunning drop in the number of plankton — the basis of the ocean's food chain. In July, another major study concluded that acidifying oceans are likely to have a "quite traumatic" impact on plankton diversity, with some species dying out while others flourish. As the oceans absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, it's converted into carbonic acid — and the pH of seawater declines. According to lead author Stephanie Dutkiewicz of MIT, that trend means "the whole food chain is going to be different."

 

The Hansen study may have gotten more attention, but the Dutkiewicz study, and others like it, could have even more dire implications for our future. The rapid changes Dutkiewicz and her colleagues are observing have shocked some of their fellow scientists into thinking that yes, actually, we're heading toward the worst-case scenario. Unlike a prediction of massive sea-level rise just decades away, the warming and acidifying oceans represent a problem that seems to have kick-started a mass extinction on the same time scale.

 

I highly encourage everyone to read more about this!!

Read more: http://www.rollingst...5#ixzz3i1gSLnpS 
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook



#8
VolterWight

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Unfortunately people are not aware of these facts and the ones who are informed couldn't care less. The biggest culprits are governors and people in positions of authority however we can make a difference on a small scale, recycling, riding a bicycle, transport instead of using your car etc

 

One of my friends said they became a vegan, as it was the simplest way to reduce their personal carbon footprint. Cows generate a lot of Methane which contributes to rise in green house gases



#9
mmmusa8888

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One of my friends said they became a vegan, as it was the simplest way to reduce their personal carbon footprint. Cows generate a lot of Methane which contributes to rise in green house gases

 

that is sad to hear


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